Our May 2018 author and work announcement newsletter.

 

Our May 2018 author and work announcement newsletter.

Written by Kenneth Shumaker.

May 2, 2018.

Hello, in our April closing newsletter I had stated I would tell you a bit about the 7-Levers, 7 weeks with 10% increase per week: The Next 100-Days double your profits 10% increase per week challenge: which was started with a challenge start date of February 26, 2018, and ending April 16, 2018. The challenge was set by Kevin Appleby from the Next 100 Days podcast.

I completed the challenge and succeeded well, with mixed results in the challenge.

Have you ever had a goal or challenge you desired to complete? Where you aimed for an end result but missed?

I’ll let you in on my secret sauce to my success which I’ve used in my different careers and in my life to attain what I want. It’s a mix of patience and goal setting; mixed with an addition of 80% strong drive. But without setting clear, precise, measurable, achievable goals, none of it would have likely been possible to achieve.

I see people all over with tonnes of drive, many people with worlds of patience and they get nowhere in life. They’re attaining and achieving little. True, quite a few are happy this way. Many aren’t.

I’ve worked with colleges in security and as an instructor and also as Chairman of the Board for years of a mental health outreach program for the province of Alberta. I was a crew foreman and then a field supervisor of a three-crew team for a province-wide company for years.

I attained these through setting goals and mixing patience, understanding, drive and adaptability together. The glue was always goal setting.

My particular method I use is a six-goal tiered system.

I set one, two, five and ten-year goals, as well as monthly, weekly and daily goals.

Each tier is set with six goals which I desire to attain.

You ask … so what? It doesn’t matter if you set goals! No one ever achieves goals!

Well, I use a carrot and stick method. If I fail to achieve at least four of the six goals in a set time period, there is a penalty. These were set at the time I had set up the goal system.

Most of the sticks are financial penalties with the money going into an account which in December is given to a charity as a gift. My current pot sits at $80.00. I had a big fail last month. My monthly fails are $50.00, while weekly fails are $10.00. Year fails I set at $200.00, so far this hasn’t been an issue. The goals for the year are accountable by November 30th. This starts on November 30th the previous year running to November 30 of the current year.

My weeks are from Sunday night to Saturday night. So, really, I only give myself a six-day week.

A four or five points success is a partial success or minor achievement and gets a small reward. So, for example, being as I recharge by being alone but I enjoy observing people interact in society, my weekly minor reward is to go for coffee by myself. This is also where I can take a study course on my tablet while occasionally observing people AND enjoy the peace and a coffee without clients/customers interrupting me, or my family! I may even take the opportunity to write. I hand wrote three chapters in a two-hour session once.

The big win is getting all six points and is a major achievement which earns a big reward. As an example; my weekly reward is to take a friend or family out for a meal, plus take two days off from work. What a bonus!

Now I made a pact with myself not to abuse the system, but I also set it up so I could stack all the penalties and reward. For examples, the penalty account is at $80.00, while the coffees are accumulated to 12, and the big wins are at 5, being as some were held over from last year still. I’m thinking of saving for a vacation.

So, regarding the results from the challenge, I told you about in the closing newsletter last month: when all bookkeeping was tallied at the end of April we had a win of a profit margin totalling $586.76 between the three business entities. This is up from our first win of $11.68 in February. Some of this was from royalties for content I produce, some was from computer repair work, some was from InUPress work.

Two of my businesses consistently lost money in 2016 and 17 as we are still in the startup development phase of our growth, while in the third business has been making a profit from day one in 2014 and has been operating in a community where four others tried to startup similar businesses and folded in less than eight months each.

Because the two entities lost so much in 2017 as I was developing them, my total margins were a loss, until February 2018. In April I saw my best month in three years. This was due to the challenge and the system of profits it advances.

There was no carrot or stick for me on this other than to use the 7-levers presented in episode 110 of the Next 100 Days podcast to achieve a profit margin of $60 or more in April.

I like challenges so I set the goals necessary, with setting up an editorial calendar and drive sheet after mud-mapping through the processes that would be necessary.

I believe in my processes, but they’re not for everyone. Many would struggle to try to use the systems. But if you think my systems might help you, just contact me to ask me more about how I work and how you might apply them. I’ve worked with others in the past, and they went on to own and run their own businesses and homes. This may not happen for you, but you never know until you take YOUR steps forward.

My intention for these opening newsletters each month is to present to you our goals and the tasks we set out to do for the month.

For May 2018 our goals of intention which we are to be held accountable for are:

  • 1: Publish & launch my novel: Larret Army: Rising Souls.
  • 2: Work on and finish Eric J Kregel’s short story manuscript developmental edit for: Transcendence Machine.
  • 3: Take and develop the manuscript of my three book series writing up to a word count of 60,000.
  • 4: Start developing my new alternative history drama thriller series: Calgary Drop, writing the pilot and a second episode.
  • 5: Layout and format the book manuscript and design the cover for publishing of: Dragoman Bloodgrue, Volume VI: Servile
  • 6: Restart our applications to the Canada Council for the Arts, membership. Applying for my author’s membership and InUPress imprint membership.

Our monthly carrot/stick system accountability ending for May 30th, 2018:

  • The stick: less than four points: Penalty account: $50.00
  • The minor achievement: four or five points: a two-day break from work with a trip to a city.
  • The major achievement: all six points: one-week break.

So, now we’re also being held accountable to all of you.

I’m Kenneth with InUPress.

May the words stay with you!

© 2018 by Kenneth Shumaker with Inevitable Unicorn Press.

inupress@inupress.ca www.inupress.ca www.kennethshumaker.ca

 

 

 

Kenneth’s April update newsletter.

Written by Kenneth Shumaker.

On April 1st, 2018.

Well! I’ve been silent to save annoying you! But I had to write you today.

Last week I wrote two serial series episodes, had a failed business work meeting and a successful work proposal acquiring a job to create a web presence for a business. This new project is including the creating of their logo, icons (their graphics) and documentation, as well as building them a webpage and producing some videos etc. I also wrote on my Star Grean book series project as well wrote on the 1st draft of my FoTS exercise (#4). I did some work with the installing of a set of new network outlets and lines in my offices as I’m getting ready for the new server, Unicorn Phoenix, which I’m building and installing for InUPress / Knights of the Square Table. I’ve cleaned and organized my offices, updating all three whiteboard calendars for April and this week, as well as the hard files which I’m working on for my businesses and author, accounts bookkeeping today.

So much is being accomplished now for me and my businesses.

As well, after talking with my coach/mentor last week, I’ve come to refocus down onto my one main commercial publishing project, the Star Grean series books project, and two writing passion projects; with writing for Virily and on my Dragoman Bloodgrue serial series. All while maintaining my income working for the computer repair business. I’m hoping more work starts flowing in soon.

I have been shotgunning on to too many different projects, and I am now working with rifle shots to see how this works out for me.

I find that I have so much to be accountable for, but right now it is Easter today for many people.

I wish you all the best on this day and every day. I wish a good life to you all. May your day be blessed with you, your family and friends being strong and happy!

© 2018 Kenneth Shumaker with Kenneth Shumaker

ken@inupress.ca www.kennethshumaker.ca

May the words stay with you!

What are the pros and cons of various publishing formats? Rusty’s Note, 008.

By Kenneth Shumaker

Issue 008

June 18, 2017 

With Inevitable Unicorn Press

 

What are the pros and cons of various publishing formats?

 

  • Self-publishing
    • Author is responsible for all aspects of work
    • Author is responsible for all your own costs
    • Author controls all rights to the work
    • Author can earn 4% to 100% royalties on net sales depending on sales distribution and vendor channels route taken
    • No agent needed
  • Supported publishing
    • Guided work with the publisher
    • Publisher looks after printing and distribution
    • Author is responsible for all fees
    • Shared control of aspects of publishing (varies with publisher)
    • The author may need to lease rights to the publisher for agreed terms
    • Author earns from 4% to 65% of either net or gross sales, depending on arrangement
    • Typically, do not need an agent 
  • Traditional publishing
    • Most publishers assign all tasks in-house, except most marketing and promotions
    • Most publishers cover most costs except marketing and promotions
    • Some publishers offer a cost sharing but then offer higher royalties or other benefits
    • The author may have to relinquish some or all of their rights
    • Publishers tend to purchase rights or lease various rights of the work
    • The author can earn 6% to 65% royalties on gross sales
    • Some publishers offer advances or other benefits
    • Usually, need an agent to acquire entry to most publishers

Today there are almost equal advantages and detriments to self-publishing and traditional publishing, while the supported publishing gets a stiff bad rap from both sides. This is not to say that all the different publishing formats condemn each other.  Some people utilise and support all three formats. These are termed the hybrid published authors, or publishers. And they take a lot of flak for fence sitting.

Myself, I’m hybrid, as I’ve dealt with all three publishing formats. I’ve been traditionally published twice, I self-publish my work, and I’ve been supported published. As well, I own a supporting desktop publishing business. With this mixed bag of experience, I may be one of the few who can speak (from experience) from on top of the fence.

Traditional publishing, gets top marks from some of those who break its barriers and squeak into the houses, getting published. Through perseverance and hard work, mixed with a ton of luck, some manage to make some money and/or fame. Basically, besides the writing and submitting manuscripts to the publisher, all the author has to do is the marketing, putting in the effort that is agreed upon with the publisher. Some publishers may still pay a small monetary advance to strong, promising authors. But the advances have reduced significantly to just a mere few thousand dollars. And the author has to realise that they receive no royalty payments until that advance is paid off. Also, with traditional publishers, royalties are paid on gross of sales after expenses are deducted. So, if you sign for a 12% royalty, you do not receive $1.20 of each $10 of sale, you receive 12% after expenses are deducted. A book selling for $10 could gross you $0.86 or less on a 12% royalty. You are also expected to do almost all of the promotions and marketing after the launch and the release. You are responsible for building your own branding, etc. Also, most publishers now expect you to have your author brand and a social presence established before they’ll sign you on.

Royalty payments tend to range from 4% to 12%, but may be as high as 24%, depending on predicted sales of your product and your marketability. This is because the publisher has to recover the thousands of dollars they spent getting your product ready for distribution and market. Once your advance is paid, you may receive your royalties quarterly, if enough accumulate.

Supported publishing generally entails a publishing house who guides you, distributes, and prints your book. They organise all the editing, book cover design, formatting, and so forth for fees. Benefits? You, as the author, don’t have to hire the people to do the work or know what needs doing. You don’t distribute to vendors or organise the printing of your product, and you don’t have to collect the sales from vendors, etc. But you pay fees, or a fee. With most reputable supported publishers, you keep the rights to the work, or they may lease just the rights you want them to have for the length of term you’re willing to lease to them. Some help you with marketing and promotions, for a fee.

Supported publishers pay you a royalty, usually much higher than a traditional publisher, as they’ve already recovered most of their costs from you. However, they still have expenses in regards to distribution and to vendors for the term of your lease or contract. So, they keep part of the sales to recover their costs. Some pay royalties on net sales, some on gross sales. The typical range for royalties varies significantly, based on your brand, marketability, and your product. The royalties, usually based on gross of sales, range from 10% to 45%, and as much as 65% in extreme cases. The author may be paid quarterly, once enough royalties have accumulated, depending on the arrangement you make with the publisher.

Self-publishing gives the author the ultimate control of the publishing, as well as total responsibility. No one else is responsible for any aspect of your publishing. The self-publisher is in charge of deciding what aspects of the publishing they will hire out. You receive no help unless you ask for it, and even then there are no certainties in receiving help. If you succeed, you reap all the rewards, except for what you parcelled out in getting the product published.

Royalties? You reap what you sell minus expenses. It varies from distribution type and vendor, being as high as 100% of net sales to as low as 4% of gross sales. It’s up to you how you distribute and to which vendors. But realise that some types of vendors and some markets are restricted and closed to self-publishers. Some markets are still reserved only to traditional publishers even today. You’re 100% responsible for marketing and promotions. You get paid depending on the schedules of the vendors and distributors and your arrangements with them.

Then comes the issues of accolades and awards. Most prestigious awards are reserved for traditionally published authors, but there are many opening up to self-published and supported published authors now, though these authors find it much harder to break into awards and accolades.

No matter what method you use, the money only arrives with sales.  You need a product that people are willing to buy, and you need to market and promote in whatever manner you can.

Typically, it is not just sheer luck that gets sales, lightning-strike success is hyper-rare – one in ten million authors. It is said that of people surveyed, 81% thought about writing something, but only 5 to 8% did. Of those authors who write, it is statistically shown that 91% see less than 200 combined sales of their works in their lifetime.

If 81% of the world’s 7 billion people want to write, that equates to roughly 5.6 billion people. Of those, supposedly only 283 million write something. Of these, 25 million sell more than 200 combined sales in their lifetime. That is if the whole world population participated.

But according to Amazon statistics and also Author Earnings, there were roughly 8 million published authors in 2016, in English speaking print. From what I can ascertain, fewer than 720,000 ever sold more than 200 combined sales on record in their lifetime. Of those, less than 11,000 broke 2,000 sales of all their combined products in one year. These figures combine traditional, supported, and self-published authors. But the records show of these roughly eleven thousand authors, 52% were self-published or supported-published. To add to this, of the top earners in the reports, the combined sales of published material in 2016, 48% were self-published or hybrid.

What I’m showing you is that it’s still anyone’s game. It is up to you, the author, to decide how much effort and expense you are willing to put into being published, and then choose your format of publishing. Don’t let naysayers sway you. Almost everyone is biased, favouring the way they’re already doing things or the way they prefer to do business.

I’ve had equally good and bad experiences in all three. My sales are equal in all three. So, I simply leave it to you to determine what level of effort you are comfortable with.

By Kenneth Shumaker

© 2017 by Kenneth Shumaker with Inevitable Unicorn Press

www.inupress.ca inupress@inupress.ca

All Rights Reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by an information storage and retrieval system (except by a reviewer who may quote brief passages in a review or other endorsement or in a recommendation to be printed in a magazine, newspaper, or on the Internet) without permission in writing from the publisher. However, when contacted the author may be generous with reprint rights and articles.

Trademarks and myriad names of products, journals, and businesses used in this work are not authorized by, associated with, or sponsored by the trademark owners. No association with the corporations or names is implied or intended.

About the author: Kenneth Shumaker

 

Following a long break from writing, Kenneth recovered his passion for writing. He is a science fiction author with Inevitable Unicorn Press (InUPress). Kenneth has been blogging with the Owerton Challenge and other blogs. He now writes several serial short stories each month. Kenneth’s two businesses, his wife, his two children, and his six grandchildren keep him busy.

 

 

Kenneth also has available coaching sessions for mentoring on the art of writing and also getting published, for C$125.99 with a one hour session, available to a limited number of applicants. To arrange an appointment email inupress@inupress.ca or call 1-780-523-5835 between 10:00 am and 5:00 pm MST, Monday through Saturday.

 

 

Discover the new novel published from InUPress by Eric J Kregel, ‘Exhaust from the Tin Woods’ out now in InUPress.ca, Amazon (Kindle and paperback) and Kobo.

: Amazon.ca

: Kobo.com

: InUPress.ca

 

 

Join Kenneth Shumaker (Rusty Knight) in his Dragoman Bloodgrue Volume anthologies.  ‘Volume I: Fare Where?’ is the first of the Bloodgrue serial series. Read how Bloodgrue tests the gods’ resolve. Do the gods let the brave be fools? Is Bloodgrue brave or a fool? Follow Bloodgrue to see where his life’s path wanders. In ‘Dragoman Bloodgrue Volume I: Fare Where?’ we are introduced to Bloodgrue as he begins his journey climbing the social ranks of Mount Oryn in North Docks.

Find this volume on:

: Amazon

: InUPress

: Kobo

 

Awesome! You finished episode 008 of Rusty’s Notes.

Let us know what you think of Rusty’s Notes by following this links: www.inupress.ca While you are there, you can join the Inevitable Unicorn Press e-mail subscription list to receive news and updates about work from our authors such as; Kenneth Shumaker, Brian Hill, Dr. Eric J Kregel and Aria. When you sign up for the e-mail list, you will receive a free document when you first sign up. This free pdf changes with time, the gift was a copy of Kenneth Shumaker’s. biography of the protagonists, the Black Swans, from his epic fantasy novel, Laret. Later the bonus was an episode from the epic fantasy serial series, Lanis’.

While on the home page of InUPress.ca leave a comment, telling us what you think of our author’s work, or us leave your thoughts about the website. We appreciate your time and we will try to respond to questions and comments.

Thank you for reading Rusty’s Notes

Yours,

Kenneth Shumaker with Inevitable Unicorn Press,

 

 

We would like to acknowledge the following for their contributions:

Our author is Kenneth Shumaker.

Our graphics are by Kenneth Shumaker.

All editing is by Donna Shumaker.

The production, publishing and distribution along with marketing and promotions are by Inevitable Unicorn Press also known as InUPress.

 

 

If you desire to reach us, we can be contacted at any of the following sources:

www.inupress.ca

or through email at either:

inupress@inupress.ca

or give InUPress a phone call at:

1-780-523-5835

or reach InUPress postal mail at:

InUPress

Rusty’s Den

Box 3323

High Prairie, Alberta, Canada

T0G 1E0

 

How do I chose my Writing Style?

 

 

How do I chose my writing style?

 

So, apart from wishing you all a great year, I’ll start with a simple basic question that crops up in writing groups, such as ‘Fellowship of the Scribblers as well as on many online forums for writers.

It’s not as easy as it appears, “What style of writing will work for me?”. I know, it sounds innocent, but it’s not.

Writing ‘style’ can mean different things to different people, for example, it can involve genre, tropes, format, settings location, worlds, environment, etc. It might also involve, pen and paper versus laptop or desktop computers, or audio dictation; you have to decide if you’re writing a novel, short story or a novella; are you writing fiction or non-fiction; are you writing to be commercial or non-commercial.

Asking what style works for me, is too general and to broad of a question to be properly answered with a reply. Instead, this must be responded to with questions. For example: do you want to write fiction or non-fiction? Do you want to make money and be commercial? Or simply, do you wish to write to express yourself? And several other essential questions, to start narrowing down your narrative literature style.

But there are also the environmental aspects such as, do you wish to have a physical hard paper copy, or are you better with an electronic computer copy? Do you find writing at home better, or is sitting in an office more suited to your needs, or may be writing in a crowded coffee shop suits you better, or may be at some other venue? Are you more productive in the morning, afternoon, or the evening? Do you prefer writing when in a warmer or cooler environment? While drinking coffee or tea, or may be drinking water, or nothing at all? Do you like to have music playing, or a TV going, or do you prefer silence, or the sounds of nature? Do you have family responsibilities, or may be work duties? What are your other life responsibilities? How much time do you have available for writing? Are you a scheduler, or do you like to fly by the seat of your pants?

Then, when you’re writing, do you plan out the plot? Do you outline your chapters and every character, along with the setting? How much research do you do, and when, in both fiction and non-fiction?

Do you co-write collaboratively with other authors, or alone? Do you share creative responsibility with graphic artists? Are you working with audio recording studios?

Do you have a set deadline or is your project open ended time wise? Do you have a project or idea? Do you have a contract to deal with? Are you ghostwriting for someone else, or maybe you are writing your own piece?

All these items and more queries will go into what your style of writing will be. More importantly, you need to realise your style will change, as do most artist’s styles change. So, you must be adaptable and evolve with the changes as time progresses. The question is much more complex than the few simple words it is composed of – what style of writing will work for me today, is more accurate, and be able to adapt with the moment.

So, for example, I have two times of day in which I write well in: early morning around 5 am, and also in the afternoon between 3 and 8 pm. I work well with either music playing, generally pop or rock music, or in silence, depending on my mood. I write equally easily with both: pen and paper, as well as on computers, at my desk in my office. I tend to drink both: coffee and water while writing, and occasionally I’ll brew a pot of tea in the morning to drink while I write. I find I write serial series short stories typically, but I also write novels, and they’re both almost always fiction, but I do write several non-fiction articles for blogs. In the past, I have written poetry that has won an award and has been traditionally published. I write best when I’m alone, I almost never write in the company of others. The main genres I tend to write in are fantasy and science fiction. I co-author with one other author with whom I’ve grown a writing rapport, together we’re writing in the epic-fantasy genre. I’m able to write with her because we write with a similar format. I have been traditionally published and now I self-publish my own books, blogs and serial series, as well as I publish other authors work.

A writer can’t evolve alone, they need to explore with other writer’s work and receive feedback to grow and to gain experience, to produce good work. They need this to learn a style that works for them. The writer needs to continually attempt different ways of writing, in different styles, or they’ll never grow and learn, or improve.

 

Thank you,

Yours, Rusty Knight

Awesome! You finished an episode of Rusty’s Notes.

Let us know what you think of Rusty’s Notes by following this links: www.inupress.ca While you are there, you can join the Inevitable Unicorn Press e-mail subscription list to receive news and updates about work from our authors such as; Rusty Knight, Kenneth Shumaker, Brian Hill, Dr. Eric J Kregel and Aria. When you sign up for the e-mail list, you will receive a free pdf when you first sign up. This free pdf changes with time, the gift was a copy of Rusty Knight’s biography of the protagonists, the Black Swans, from his epic fantasy novel, Laret. Later the bonus was an episode from the epic fantasy serial series, Lanis’.

While on the home page of InUPress.ca leave a comment, telling us what you think of our author’s work, or us leave your thoughts about the website. We appreciate your time and we will try to respond to questions and comments.

Thank you for reading Rusty’s Notes

Yours,

Rusty Knight with Inevitable Unicorn Press,

of Rusty’s Notes

 

© 2017 by Rusty Knight with Inevitable Unicorn Press

www.inupress.ca inupress@inupress.ca

All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by an information storage and retrieval system (except by a reviewer who may quote brief passages in a review or other endorsement or in a recommendation to be printed in a magazine, newspaper, or on the Internet) without permission in writing from the publisher. However, when contacted the author may be generous with reprint rights and articles.

No association with any corporations or names is implied or intended.

We would like to acknowledge the following for their contributions

Our author is Rusty Knight

Our graphics are by Rusty Knight

All editing is by Donna Shumaker

The production, publishing and distribution along with marketing and promotions are by Inevitable Unicorn Press also known as InUPress

If you desire to reach us, we can be contacted at any of the following sources

www.inupress.ca

or through email at either

inupress@inupress.ca

Or call InUPress at

1-780-523-5835

Or reach InUPress’ postal mail at

InUPress

Rusty’s Den

Box 3323

High Prairie, Alberta, Canada

T0G 1E0

 

 

 

Rusty Knight and InUPress with advise for writers

Good day, I’m the author and publisher Rusty Knight and Kenneth Shumaker. Let me explain that. My given name is Kenneth, please call me Ken, I started writing and publishing under the name Kenneth Shumaker with my poetry in 1982, for which I won the American Poetry Society’s, Best New Poet of the Year Award, and in the following year, 1983, I was traditionally published in an anthology of poetry of which I don’t even recall who the publisher imprint was. I’ve never received any royalties from the publisher. I gave up writing right away in a misguided attempt to finish my education with mechanical engineering. I had been invited to give a presentation in the spring of 1983, to give my poetry in a reading to over 5,000 people at a convention in Seattle, Washington. But due to several factors, which included financial constraints, I never made it to the convention.

That, you might think, is the beginning of my writing career and a promising beginning. It was a bump in my life as a writer and an author. As a writer, I began in the summer of 1969, at age five with a twelve-page story about George the dolphin, which I wrote double spaced in a primer scribbler with a number two pencil. My writing took a more serious turn in grade nine with a 352-page science-fiction novel which my family saw the first draft of, and I still have buried in a box somewhere. The writing became serious again with the Owertonna Challenge Blog in October 2009 which ran almost weekly until June 2015, it had over 1,800 following readers. But as an author, things became even more real when Kelli from Kellan Publishing took a risk to publish a fantasy serial series of mine titled ‘Bloodgrue’. Kelli and I discussed my writing under the pseudonym, Rusty Knight for my fantasy work. In April 2015 Kelli challenged me to write twenty-four 2,000 word episodes in thirty days, and then to continue writing another twenty-four episodes in the following six months. I succeeded, and in May 2015 I wrote twenty-six episodes, and by November 2015 I had completed fifty episodes. With my official Kellan Publishing launch on August 2 2015 of the ‘Bloodgrue’ serial series, I never received an advance when I signing up, and we were both taking a risk. There are now 68 episodes written of the ‘Dragoman Bloodgrue’ series, of which twenty-two are currently being distributed with the Inevitable Unicorn Press imprint, as Kellan Publishing had difficulty distributing the series, and with amicable discussions we parted ways. Most of the episodes are over 3,000 words in length; I have several different series now, as well as print and e-book anthologies in distribution with InUPress, Amazon, Kindle and Kobo. I also took up co-authoring a series with another writer in 2014 and really enjoy writing with her, we now have a back log of 131 episodes together and we write fairly much everyday, with InUPress publishing our episodes on the blog, ‘Bard & Dragoman’; we’ve currently published up to episode 084 as of March 10, 2017. I have written over 149 short stories in the three years from January 2014 to December 2017, and one eighty-four-thousand-word epic fantasy novel.

As a publisher with InUPress, I have had varied experiences. I’ve learned a lot from my experiences with the American Poetry Society and the publisher of that poetry, also there is working on my novel ‘Laret’ with iUniverse Publishing, and the experience of working with Kelli at Kellan publishing, as well as knowledge gained from such online sources as J F Penn, Jeff Goins and Mark Dawson among a host of others.

As well there is over a year of working with various authors with my own imprint, Inevitable Unicorn Press. I’ve been learning about such items as: ISBNs and ISSNs, copyrights, copywriting, book covers, book formatting for print and e-books, document design and formatting, marketing, promotions, social media, distribution, etc. There are multiple facets to learn and normally it is accomplished by a team of people, but here at InUPress, I’ve taken on all the hats, even as content, developmental and formatting editor. I have one other person working with me, an editor who freelances for me.

I have had authors come to me expecting me to do all the production, publishing and distribution work, and for me not to be paid, then they wanted more than 70% royalties, I flatly turned them away. I have had other authors approach me to publish them, and they give me first draft manuscripts so bad that they were unreadable. I refused to deal with those authors. I have had still other authors approach me to publish them, then they refuse to offer me any part of their manuscript, but they started trying to negotiate a deal. I turned these authors away. You want to be published, be reasonable, publishers are people and will only work with information they are given and we generally deal with, and only work with polite personable people.

I work with a couple authors now, Eric J Kregel and Brian Hill, who both currently have manuscripts in the pipeline. The process, when going through a publisher, isn’t instantaneous because the editors, cover designers, etc. have to be lined up and dealt with on their schedules. No self-respecting publisher will just distribute a raw manuscript that has been submitted to the publisher, by any writer or author. So, it can be months, even up to years in the process, from initial writer’s query through to final distribution and the book launch, depending on your manuscript and the goals at the outset.

Thank you, yours, Ken, the author and publisher Rusty Knight

© 2017 by Rusty Knight with Inevitable Unicorn Press

www.inupress.ca inupress@inupress.ca

What is creative Writing? The definition of writing!

What is creative writing? What is the definition of writing?

Definitions:

  • Writing – the activity or skill of marking coherent words with mediums and composing text.
    • Written work, especially with regard to its style or quality.
    • The act or practice of literary or musical composition.
    • The occupation of a writer, the profession of authorship.
  • Creative writing – is any non-technical fiction literature.
    • Typically includes narrative crafted with character development and the use of literary tropes or various poetics.
    • This includes novels, biographies, short stories, poetry and non-fictional journalism as well as screenplay and stage play writing.
    • Typically, any writing of original composition.
  • The process of creative writing by some is considered to be a crafting of thought-out original work, to be an experience in creative problem solving.
  • Elements of creative writing include such things as theme and motif, voice, tone, style, and point of view coming in such forms as creative non-fiction like journalistic-fiction, and other form like novels, novellas, fan-fiction, poetry, short stories and screen plays by writers in solo efforts and in collaboration with other writers.

Being a writer doesn’t make one an author, but being an author requires one to be a writer to some degree, as an author is a professionally published writer.

Fiction and non-fiction are both works created by writers but not necessarily by creative writers. I find some very good technical journals and instruction manuals written by people who have no artist creative bones in their body, thus would not be able to write a creative writing piece, even if their lives depended on it. But there are also creative writers who do not have the discipline or skills and could not write a technical piece for the sake of their lives as well.

Creative writing is a function the writer may learn, but the writer needs talent and skill to perform well. Many people can create creative writing, but a lot of the material isn’t readable even as creative reading, as it is written so poorly with bad grammar or in poor form, or maybe lacks a clear voice or theme, maybe the piece has no plot or character to drive it forward to make it interesting to read, or one or more of numerous other flaws, leaving readers displeased and choosing to not read the piece.

In conclusion, creative writing to me, is a written art even though it takes skill to master. The art requires a certain talent to successfully pull off well, which in the end is subjectively read by every reader.